Suzan Palumbo’s Caribbean Gothic

-- Originally published on October 3, 2021 in the Stabroek News Photo of the author, Suzan Palumbo If anyone had taken me aside last month and asked me what came to mind when I heard the phrase “gothic horror”, I would have given them a very narrow description. I would have told them about dilapidated …

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Post-climate change dystopia as indigenous rebirth- Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

-- Originally published on September 5, 2021 in the Stabroek News In early August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change (IPCC) released an updated report on scientists’ current understanding of the state of global warming and its implications for our present and future. This review of current climate literature is a sobering warning for our …

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Cover of The Rainmaker's Mistake by Erna Brodber

Overcoming post-Emancipation stagnation in Erna Brodber’s The Rainmaker’s Mistake

Today is Emancipation Day, and millions of Afro-Caribbean people within the Region and across the diaspora will be celebrating the 183rd anniversary of the abolition of slavery across the British Empire. We have come a far way since this first Emancipation Day, but there are still many ingrained colonialist systems and thought processes that we …

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“Manhood isn’t a monolith” and other lessons for Queer youth in George M. Johnson’s Memoir-Manifesto “All Boys Aren’t Blue”

June is Pride Month. Throughout this month, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Asexual, Interest and Queer communities and their allies - both in Guyana and across the globe - recognise, acknowledge, and celebrate the influences and achievements of the LGBT+ community through the millennia. These communities also use Pride month to highlight the …

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The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

I was drawn to The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by a Guardian Article in 2016 when the publication announced that Arundhati Roy was breaking her 20-year fiction hiatus and publishing a second novel. I was intrigued. I had come across Roy’s work near the beginning of my original reading challenge when I got a kindle sample …

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The Things They Carried

The Things They Carried is the only book on my list that I have listened to exclusively. This was purely coincidental. My father had bought the audiobook months ago, and for some reason, I was struck with a pang of laziness upon seeing the cover. I just didn’t feel like seeing the words for this …

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Reading Update (Halfway There!)

Note: For a full analysis table of my readings, click here. Dear Lord! I have been gone for quite a long time, haven’t I? I was so busy with my school work that I was forced to take a very LONG hiatus. There were so many exams, assignments, tests, and presentations that I needed to …

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Reading Table

Hello! Here is a table of the books I have read along with their associated countries and regions. I will be updating this from time to time, so do enjoy! # Book Countries and Regions 1. The Valley of Amazement by Amy Tan China East Asia U.S.A. (California and New York) North America 2. Memoirs of …

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#MyFavoriteMOMory

My mother’s greatest fear was that I would not be able to read. Don’t get me wrong. I am fortunate to not have any major problems that may impair my cognitive abilities, but still, my mother feared. This fear, as I later discovered, shaped the way she raised me. Mom told me that when she …

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Me Before You and the Ethics of Death

Because of my bad habit of stereotyping romance novels, I had no intention of ever reading Me Before You mainly because of my bad habit of stereotyping romance books. I know, I know. One should not judge a book by its genre, but romance has always seemed too overdramatic to me. For the most part, I …

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